Chapter 2: Two Critical Concepts: Health Span & Brain Health

NOTES & REFERENCES
1. AgingStats.gov. Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics.
http://www.agingstats.gov/Main_Site/Data/2012_Documents/Health_Status.aspx (Accessed on December 19, 2014)
Adams PF, Henderson GE, Marano MA. Current Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, 1996. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Statistics 10(200), 1999.
2. Family Caregiver Alliance: Incidence and Prevalence of the major causes of Brain Impairment.
http://www.caregiver.org/caregiver/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=438 (Accessed: December 27, 2013)
3. Alzheimer’s and Dementia Risk Factors: Alzheimer’s Association: http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_causes_risk_factors.asp (Accessed on December 19, 2014)
4. Vascular Dementia – eMedicine – Medscape:
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/292105-overview (Accessed on December 19, 2014)
5. Murray C, Lopez A. The Global Burden of Disease. Boston, MA: Harvard University Press, 1996.
6. Mattson MP. Existing data Suggesting that Alzheimer’s Disease is Preventable. Ann N Y Acad Sci 2000;924:153-159.
Mattson MP, Chan SL, Duan W. Modification of Brain Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders by Genes, Diet, and Behavior. Physiol Rev 2002;82:637-672.
Fillit HM, Butler RN, O’Connell AW, et al. Achieving and maintaining Cognitive Vitality with aging. Mayo Clin Proc 2002;77:681-696.
Kiraly SJ. The Healthy Brain Program: An Innovative Approach to Health Promotion. Bulletin of the Academy of Geriatric Psychiary 2003;10(2):9-13.
Kiraly SJ. Keeping the Brain Healthy. The Canadian Journal of CME 2003; March;145-150.
Small GW, Silverman DHS, Siddarth P, et al. Effects of a 14-Day Longevity Lifestyle Program on Cognitive and Brain Function. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 2006;14(6):538-545.
Benbow SM. Older People, Mental health and learning (Guest Editorial). International Psychogeriatrics 2009;21(5):799-804.
Larson E. The Rising Tide of World-wide, Late Life Dementias: Prospects and Evidence for Prevention. (Plenary) International Psychogeriatrics 2009;21(suppl 2);S1-S11.
Querfurth HW, LaFerla FM. Alzheimer’s Disease. N Engl J Med 2010;362:329-44.
Kiraly SJ. Mental Health Promotion for Seniors. BC Medical Journal 2011;53(5):336-340.
7. Canadian Study of Health and Aging Working Group. Canadian Study of Health and Aging: Study Methods and Prevalence of Dementia. Can Med Assoc J 1994;150(6):899-913.
Alzheimer Society of British Columbia. The Rising Tide of Dementia in BC. http://www.alzheimer.ca/~/media/Files/national/Advocacy/ASC_Rising_Tide_Full_Report_e.pdf (Accessed on December 19, 2014)
8. Some studies have shown that the 85 and older age group of women have lower rates of severe neurocognitive impairment (NCI) than men of the same age. That is a sampling error. Women outlive men and as a result there will be more healthy women in the group. Men deteriorate sooner and have more impairment within the same age group, especially in the limbic system which in men is not protected by the estrogen effect (Black S, Cullen D. Neurobiology of Aging 2005. Sunnybrook and Women’s Health Sciences Centre, Toronto).
9. Payami H. University of Oregon. AAN Meeting. April 23, 1999.
10. Schoenhofen EA, Wyszynski DF, Andersen S et al. Characteristics of 32 supercentenarians. J Am Geriatr Soc 2006;54(8):1237-40.
11. Canadian Study of Health and Aging Working Group. Canadian Study of Health and Aging: Study Methods and Prevalence of Dementia. Can Med Assoc J 1994;150(6):899-913.
The Canadian Alzheimer Disease Review. 2000;July:23.

Reviewed on July 14, 2015